15 things you thought were true blue, but might not be

15 things you thought were Australian, but might not be


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You might find some surprises in this list of what's Australian and what belongs to our Kiwi neighbours.

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The debate of what’s Australian and what’s Kiwi has long raged. 

From the Pavlova to Phar Lap to Russell Crowe and a tonne of sports stars – it seems everything is up for debate when it comes claiming “she’s Australian, mate!”.

And now, as the nationality of our Deputy Prime Minister comes into question, we thought it was worth taking a look at the origins of some of our most hotly-contested personalities and items.

Pavlova

Who knew a meringue-based dessert could inspire such debate! But oh how the debate has raged for years.

Finally, it has been decided (by powers higher than us) the inventors were the Kiwis.

Russell Crowe

Russell Crowe

Russell Crowe

Ahhhh Rusty. At times both Australia and New Zealand have claimed him, and unclaimed him.

But Crowe was born in Wellington, New Zealand, and moved to Australia when he was four.

Then he went back to the land of the long white cloud in his teens before returning to Australia in his twenties.

He remains a Kiwi to this day.

Crowded House

Crowded House

Crowded House

No debate here, even Neil Finn has said Crowded House is an Australian band. The band was founded here and two-thirds of those founding members were Australian.

ANZAC biscuits

Apparently, the biscuit as we know it today, was invented in New Zealand.

Phar Lap in New Mexico in 1932 with strapper Tommy Woodcock.

Phar Lap in New Mexico in 1932 with strapper Tommy Woodcock.

Phar Lap

This giant-hearted horse won fame and glory for Australia in the late 1920s and early 1930s but he was actually foaled in New Zealand.

Flat White

Apparently this debate is still raging. American coffee company Starbucks claims the Aussie invented this, but others say it was the Kiwis in the 1980s. Do you know the truth?

Keith Urban

Keith Urban

Keith Urban

This Australian country singer with an American accent was actually born in New Zealand.

He moved to Queensland, Australia, when he was 17.

He moved to America in 1992.

Fred Hollows

Fred Hollows

Fred Hollows

This Australian legend was born in Dunedin, New Zealand.

Weet-Bix

Turns out Aussie kids are Weet-Bix kids. Phew!

Despite the cereal being manufactured in both Australia and New Zealand it was developed in Perth, Australia, in the 1920s.

Lamingtons. Photo: Edwina Pickles

Lamingtons. Photo: Edwina Pickles

Lamingtons

We don’t see what the debate is about here, clearly it’s an Aussie treat.

It is believed the square cakes were named after either Lord Lamington, who served as Governor of Queensland from 1896 to 1901, or his wife Lady Lamington.

Quade Cooper

This Wallabies player was actually born in Auckland, New Zealand.

He moved to Australia as a 13-year-old.

Karmichael Hunt. Photo: AAP Image/Dave Hunt

Karmichael Hunt. Photo: AAP Image/Dave Hunt

Karmichael Hunt

Hunt is another Aussie rugby player born in Auckland, New Zealand.

He played for the Queensland Reds in the Rugby Union and previously played League for the Brisbane Broncos.

He jumped codes again in 2009 to play AFL.

James Tamou. Photo: Wolter Peeters

James Tamou. Photo: Wolter Peeters

James Tamou

Rounding out the rugby players is Kiwi-born Tamou who plays for the Penrith Panthers in the NRL.

Brendan Julian. Photo: Tamara Dean

Brendan Julian. Photo: Tamara Dean

Brendan Julian

Julian was a fast-medium bowler on the Australian cricket team between 1993 and 1999, but he was actually born in New Zealand.

Archie Thompson. Photo: Vince Caligiuri

Archie Thompson. Photo: Vince Caligiuri

Archie Thompson

Another Kiwi playing sport in Australia, Thompson played soccer for Australia and for Murray United in the National Premier Leagues.

Now to test your knowledge

So you think you retained heaps of information from our list? Put your brain to the test here (and expect a few other curve balls!)

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