Father and son master massive pumpkin challenge

Father son duo grow an orange masterpiece in their backyard


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HUGE: Father and son duo Danny and Liam Reyland pose with their giant pumpkin in their backyard. Picture: ELIJAH MACCHIA

HUGE: Father and son duo Danny and Liam Reyland pose with their giant pumpkin in their backyard. Picture: ELIJAH MACCHIA

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Danny and Liam Reyland will be eating pumpkin soup for breakfast, lunch and dinner from now on.

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FATHER and son duo Danny and Liam Reyland have grown a giant pumpkin at their Horsham property during the spring and summer months. 

The pumpkin measures to a circumference of almost six feet and one inch. 

Liam said he was given pumpkin seeds when he was 12.

He had since dreamed of growing a pumpkin larger than his torso. 

He said there was a lot more work in growing a giant pumpkin than he and his father thought. 

“There are female flowers (on the plant) and we had to remove every single one of those,” he said. 

“By the end of it we had to cut off more than 200 female flowers.” 

Liam said the duo only left the two biggest pumpkins on the plant. 

“The pumpkin has only been growing for about two months,” he said. 

Liam said he took half-an-hour from every day to look after the pumpkin.

Liam and Danny said the pumpkin plant needed at least a bathtub of water a day.

The pair have been trying to grow a giant pumpkin for several years and Danny said through trial and error and some internet searches, they figured out the best way to grow one. 

“We found out that you should have only a couple of pumpkins going, because if you have a lot all the energy goes all over the place instead of two,” he said. 

“We have the hose on the plant for about 20 minutes every day. We would maybe put 80 to 100 litres on it a day.” 

Danny said it was their third attempt at growing a giant pumpkin. 

“I said we were going to do it this time,” he said. 

In their first attempt Danny thought they could only buy the seeds from America but when the seeds arrived in Australia, they were seized by customs and were destroyed. 

The second attempt saw the Reyland’s buying seeds from Queensland.

Danny said they ordered them too late, near the end of summer. 

He said as it got colder in the mornings, they couldn’t save the plant. 

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