Sweet focus on future proofing pollination services at return of Australian Bee Congress

Sweet focus on future proofing pollination services at return of Australian Bee Congress

Horticulture
“Pollination and Beekeeping for the Future” is very much in line with the key goals of the research project. Photo: supplied

“Pollination and Beekeeping for the Future” is very much in line with the key goals of the research project. Photo: supplied

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Key updates and insights from one of Australia’s most ambitious and wide-ranging pollination research projects will be shared at the 3rd Australian Bee Congress that begins on the Gold Coast today.

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Key updates and insights from one of Australia’s most ambitious and wide-ranging pollination research projects will be shared at the 3rd Australian Bee Congress that begins on the Gold Coast today.

Researchers working on the AgriFutures Australia managed project Securing Pollination for More Productive Agriculture: Guidelines for effective pollinator management and stakeholder adoption –– will deliver their latest findings, all focused on future proofing pollination services to the 65 per cent of horticultural and agricultural industries reliant on the health of Australia’s honey bee and pollination sector.

The four year project is supported by funding from the Australian Government Department of Agriculture and Water Resources as part of its Rural R&D for Profit program. It involves four universities and eighteen partners, including peak industry primary producer organisations, natural resource management organisations and state government agencies.

Securing Pollination Project Manager Paul Blackshaw said the theme of the Congress – “Pollination and Beekeeping for the Future” is very much in line with the key goals of the research project.

“There’s no doubt that in recent years there’s been a much needed renewed focus on the importance of pollination to Australia’s agricultural and horticultural sectors, which has created a wider awareness throughout the community about why bees are a precious commodity,” Mr Blackshaw said.

“It’s incredibly exciting to be only 12 months into the active research phase of the project and already have some robust findings and insights that our researchers can share at the Bee Congress.

“The last Australian Bee Congress was held in 1988, so it’s quite a landmark return to the industry conference landscape and we’re very pleased have researchers from this Rural R&D for Profit project on the program.”

The Congress runs from 27 - 30 June 2018 at RACV Royal Pines Resort, Gold Coast.

The story Sweet focus on future proofing pollination services at return of Australian Bee Congress first appeared on The Land.

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