SA wine researcher selected as STEM role model

Roberta De Bei chosen as Superstar of STEM

Horticulture
University of Adelaide wine research fellow Roberta De Bei is excited about showing girls and young women that a successful career in science, technology, engineering and mathematics can be fun and attainable.

University of Adelaide wine research fellow Roberta De Bei is excited about showing girls and young women that a successful career in science, technology, engineering and mathematics can be fun and attainable.

Aa

University of Adelaide wine researcher Roberta De Bei has been selected among Australia's latest Superstars of STEM.

Aa

University of Adelaide wine industry researcher Roberta De Bei has been selected among Australia's latest Superstars of STEM.

This year, 60 outstanding women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics have been chosen for the program run by Science & Technology Australia.

The Superstars of STEM program supports and trains women to share their passion for STEM with the Australian community, through the media, social media and on stage.

Dr De Bei who is a research fellow in Adelaide's School of Agriculture, Food and Wine focused on helping viticulturists to improve their vineyard management so that quality wine can be consistently produced.

Despite growing up in the only province of Italy where there is no wine production, Dr De Bei pursued a career in viticulture. She moved to Australia after completing her PhD at the University of Padova.

 Dr De Bei has been with the University of Adelaide for 10 years, where her research interests include vine physiology, vine performance and sustainable vineyard management.

She is passionate about delivering practical outcomes for the wine industry and is the co-inventor of a smartphone App that enables real-time monitoring of grapevine canopy architecture to improve vineyard management.

She won the Australian Women in Wine award for Researcher of the Year in 2016 for her contribution to the Australian wine industry.

"Being a Superstar of STEM is exciting for many reasons," Dr De Bei said

"My participation in this program is a great opportunity to broaden my skill set and build on my commitment to championing change for women in STEM. This will improve my effectiveness in communicating with the media, in public forums, and with high-profile members of the community.

"I would also like to fulfil the program aim of becoming a role model for girls and young women, especially those of migrant descent who are like me, by showing that a career in STEM is fun and attainable."

Aa

From the front page

Sponsored by