Horticulture given bucks to get greener

Smart Farming Partnerships gives money to get farms more environmental

Horticulture
BETTER: Another round of the Smart Farming Partnerships program could help farmers reduce their environmental impacts on areas such as the Great Barrier Reef.

BETTER: Another round of the Smart Farming Partnerships program could help farmers reduce their environmental impacts on areas such as the Great Barrier Reef.

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The Smart Farming Partnerships can help horticulturalists improve their environmental care.

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MORE than $2.9 million in new technology will go towards helping growers in horticulture to improve their green credentials.

The federal government announced the funding through the second round of its $57.5 million Smart Farming Partnerships program, which itself is part of phase two of the National Landcare Program.

Smart Farms encourages the development and uptake of best practice and technology to help primary industries protect soils, water and vegetation and improve productivity

Hort Innovation is being funded to deliver the project "Digital remote monitoring to improve horticulture's environmental performance" over the next four years.

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Agriculture minister, David Littleproud, said the project would help protect fragile ecosystems such as the Great Barrier Reef, Murray-Darling and coastal lake systems.

"Farmers are the best environmental custodians we have and this will make them better," Mr Littleproud said.

"New technology is making on-farm environmental work easier and cheaper. Good environmental stewardship will see farm-gate prices improve by building on Australia's reputation for producing the world's best food.

TRUST: Federal agriculture minister, David Littleproud, says farmers are the best environmental custodians.

TRUST: Federal agriculture minister, David Littleproud, says farmers are the best environmental custodians.

"This project has four pilot smart farms in the Great Barrier Reef catchment.

"This could help reduce the loss of nutrients and soil into the Great Barrier Reef lagoon, saving money and resources while improving environmental outcomes.

"The industry is watching this project closely for broader national applications."

He said the government wanted to help agriculture become a $100 billion industry by 2030.

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